ANSTO Deuteration facility supports research into how the COVID19 virus enters cells

ANSTO Deuteration facility supports research into how the COVID19 virus enters cells

The National Deuteration Facility at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, (ANSTO) has provided high-quality deuterated lipids to a large international collaboration that investigates how the covid19 virus interacts with the lipids in the human cell membranes.

This is an important piece of information to better understand how the virus invades human cells. The study published in Scientific Reports (DOI) showed that the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein interacts with lipids and cholesterol in the cell membranes, which allows the viral RNA to enter our cells. The insight from this study opens new avenues to develop drugs stopping the virus from infecting human cells.

Get the full story here.

Previous News Articles

Biophysical Society Travel Awards and Family Care Grants
Biophysical Society Travel Awards and Family Care Grants

The Biophysical Society has a series of travel awards for students, postdoctoral researchers and senior scientists as well as family...

More info
2021 AINSE Postgraduate O’Week (Online) – submit EOI by Oct 11
2021 AINSE Postgraduate O’Week (Online) – submit EOI by Oct 11

Expressions of interest are now open for students to attend the 2021 Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) Postgraduate...

More info
Australian Biophysics Research presented at the Faraday Discussion Meeting on Peptide-Membrane Interactions
Australian Biophysics Research presented at the Faraday Discussion Meeting on Peptide-Membrane Interactions

Australian Biophysics was well represented at the recent Faraday Discussion on Peptide-Membrane Interactions  with Prof Mibel Aguilar, A/Prof Ron Clarke...

More info
Biophysics at the Dawn of Exascale Computers. A Biophysical Society thematic meeting
Biophysics at the Dawn of Exascale Computers. A Biophysical Society thematic meeting

Cryo-EM, X-ray laser spectroscopy, machine learning, omics and maybe soon large-scale simulations of entire cells? The ability to study...

More info